Friday, January 08, 2021

Foundation Paper Piecing Tutorial


I wrote a foundation paper piecing tutorial a few years ago that was originally a free pattern on Craftsy. Ever since they removed all the patterns I have had it on my list to redo and add it to my blog. The very hot weather and inside time this week has given me the chance to get it done!
For the tutorial I am using this easy block which is is 4 1/2" x 9" finished, but you can scale it down (or up) if you wish. 


The template can be printed on either letter or A4 paper. The one on the left is printed on normal copy paper, which I find fine to use especially on larger blocks with bigger pieces. It is harder to rip, and I do not like using it when the block has small pieces, but it can be done. So if that is all you have then use it.   The one on the left is printed on Foundation paper which I bought at a patchwork shop. It is much easier to rip and use, but it can be expensive. 
After you have printed off the template cut around it leaving an extra 1/4" or so past the seam allowances. 
You really don't need any special equipment to do foundation paper piecing. You can get by with a rotary cutter, iron and a quilting ruler. but there are a couple of things I like that make it that little bit easier, such as a glue pen, roller and an 'add a 1/4 inch ruler'.
I used rectangular scraps to make my block. I just made sure that they were all bigger than the area I needed to cover.
On the wrong side of the fabric place one piece of fabric. Make sure it covers area 1, and extends past the stitching line by at least 1/4". I use a small bit of fabric glue to hold it in place.
Place a second piece of fabric on top with the right sides together
Pin it in place on the sewing side, and sew on the line. Don't sew over the pin!
I set my stitch length to 1.5 or 1.6 on my Bernina, which I think works out to 17 or 18 stitches per inch. Shortening the stitch length ensures that the paper is much easier to rip out at the end. 
Flip the second piece back over and make sure that it covers area 2. Press it flat. I like to use a roller (bought at a quilt shop) so I don't always have to go to my ironing board.
Fold down the paper on the stitching line between sections 2 and 3.
Trim the fabric, leaving a 1/4 inch for the seam allowance. 
You can use a quilting ruler, but I like this 'add a 1/4" ruler' ruler which has a 'lip' that sits perfectly on the paper and you get a perfect 1/4" seam allowance every time.
Place the next fabric on top, right sides together. Turn and pin. 
Sew on the line. Continue covering sections 4-8 until the block is filled. 
Press the entire block and turn to the sewing side to trim.
Trim the paper and fabrics on the outer seam allowance line.
Carefully remove the paper.
And the block is finished!
I made 10 blocks in a pink, grey and red colour way to make this mini-quilt! 

Sunday, December 06, 2020

Mod Flowers Quilt

The Mod Flower Quilt. 
This is one of those quilts that started with an ice for just one block.  

And then I thought about making variations of the block.

I joined them together with the white background fabric into sections.
And ket making more variations until I had enough for a small quilt. 




I found the perfect Westalee ruler for quilting the quilt.  Cute little flowers that for perfectly with the blocks. 


This was such a fun quilt to make. It was nice to not have a plan and see where it went as I added blocks. 
I think a bigger version of this is definitely in my plans!


Wednesday, December 02, 2020

Sunflower Quilt

Blogging has definitely taken a a back seat over the last two years since I have been back teaching, but I'm really missing being able to look back at things I've created and having a record of the quilts and the clothes that I have made. So I'm going to try (who knows how long it will last) blogging a little more. 

My Sunflower Quilt was finished last year, but when I checked today I realised I never blogged the finished quilt!
I loved making this quilt. Big blocks made from 16 fat quarters of Karen Lewis fabric in the best colours. 
I think this would look great any printed fabric or combination of solids.

Now off to finish reports and sort things for the end of the year so I can get to some summer sewing!







Tuesday, December 01, 2020

Mod Flower Applique Quilt

My Mod Flower Applique Quilt is finished!! I have been slowly working away on this project for most of this year. Over the last couple of years I've really enjoyed having a slow stitching project on the go. Something I can pick up at night, if only for 20 minutes, while I watch something or talk to the girls.

I used a fat quarter bundle of Moda Solids for this quilt. Each block is a reverse appliqued flower which were then machine pieced together. 
Then I hand quilted each block with 2 strands of matching DMC embroidery thread, crosses for the backgrounds and centres and running stitch for the petals. It took forever, but it is totally worth it to get the amazing texture it creates.

 It is so exciting to see it finished, but I'm feeling a little lost without a slow stitching project. I have a few ideas for a new one, I just have to make a decision on which one to start!

Monday, October 12, 2020

Bright Flowers Quilt Pattern

Bright Flowers was originally published in a magazine a couple of years ago and getting the PDF ready has been on my list for a while, but others things kept taking priority until last week. So here it is - the Bright Flowers pattern!

You can find it here on Etsy.


 

Saturday, September 05, 2020

Zing Quilt Pattern

A new pattern!
Zing is a Layer Cake Quilt. With a finished size of 48" x 60" (122cm x 152cm) it is the perfect quilt for a child or for keeping on the sofa.
Fabric - I used Remix by Jen Kingwell which is so bright and happy, but this is a pattern that will look good in any fabric collection.
You can find the pattern here on Etsy.



 

Sunday, July 19, 2020

Simplicity 8418

My new favourite jacket - Simplicity 8418 in barkcloth by Leah Duncan for Cloud 9. 
I didn't make a muslin for this one, and luckily it fits perfectly. The fabric is a little heavier than what is normally used for a bomber jacket, so it doesn't have the best drape, but combined with the lining it is a very warm jacket. Perfect for the middle of winter here. 
The instructions were not bad, but I still couldn't work out how to finish the sleeves properly and I didn't want to take too much time to do it, so the seams are not inside the lining, but they will never be seen so it's not worrying me. I'm also not a huge fan of the pockets in the side seams - if I made this again I would definitely do welt pockets towards the front more. 
I am happy with it, I've worn it a few times and the fabric makes me very happy!